Mid-Autumn Moon Festival Celebration at Bang Bang Oriental Foodhall

London’s largest Asian foodhall, Bang Bang Oriental, will be hosting a day of celebrations for the Moon Festival from Noon on Saturday 30 September 2017.

The Moon festival will be free to enter with performances from Noon until 2pm. Guests will be able to experience a traditional lion dance which will be followed by Chinese face mask changing (Biàn Liǎn) and a ribbon dance. Biàn Liǎn is an ancient Chinese dramatic art which originates from the 1700s. Guests will then be wowed by a magic show, Chinese fan dance and a Wing Chun performance.

The foodhall will be hosting a pomelo game where participants will compete to peel pomelos. Those who peel the pomelo in the given time limit will be rewarded with a Féraud Paris scarf. Pomelos (a fruit that can be found in China, Japan, Malaysia and Thailand) are commonly used as decorations in Chinese homes. It is believed that a pair of pomelos is a symbol of family unity.

From 1pm until 4pm there will be a children’s workshop taking place. This will feature story telling, face painting and a chance for children to create their own Chinese lanterns.

Raffle tickets will be available to purchase for £1 with all proceeds going to Young Barnet Foundation. There will be an array of exciting prizes including a 7 day Finland Northern Lights holiday for one with Lulutrip, a £50 voucher for Golden Dragon Colindale Restaurant for three lucky winners, plus creamy custard moon cakes and Saint Honore snowy moon cakes for 10 winners. The raffle draw will be held at 4.30pm on the main stage.

Visitors to the foodhall will be able to purchase a box of traditional Mooncakes from Royal China and WONDERFUL PATISSERIES. Flavours include mini egg yolk custard Mooncakes from Royal China; and mango, blueberry, cranberry, green tea and red bean from WONDERFUL PATISSERIES. The Moon Festival is a celebration for lunar worship during which Mooncakes are considered a delicacy. Mooncakes are round pastries with a thick filling, usually made from red bean or lotus seed paste and are eaten in small wedges accompanied by Chinese tea.

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